Al-Anon symbol“Al-Anon’s logo is a triangle with a circle inside. The three sides of the triangle symbolize our three legacies: Recovery through acceptance of the Steps, Unity through acceptance of the Traditions and Service through acceptance of the Concepts.  All three sides are necessary for the triangle to remain a triangle, just as a three-legged stool needs all three legs in order to stand.

The circle within the triangle has been described by some Al-Anon members as a circle of welcome that carries the Al-Anon message of hope to the many families and friends who are living in or have lived with the disease of alcoholism. In this simple symbol, we find represented the spiritual principles that unite us in our common bond; recovery from the effects of the family disease of alcoholism.”

Above us floats a banner on which is inscribed the new symbol for A.A., a circle enclosing a triangle. The circle stands for the whole world of A.A., and the triangle stands for A.A.’s Three Legacies of Recovery, Unity, and Service. Within our wonderful new world, we have found freedom from our fatal obsession. That we have chose this particular symbol is perhaps no accident. The priests and seers of antiquity regarded the circle enclosing the triangle as a means of warding off the spirits of evil, and A.A.’s circle and triangle of Recovery, Unity, and Service has certainly meant all of that to us and much more.” (p. 139)

 

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve-Step_Program

A Twelve-Step Program is a set of guiding principles (accepted by members as ‘spiritual principles,’ based on the approved literature) outlining a course of action for recovery from addiction, compulsion, or other behavioral problems. Originally proposed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a method of recovery from alcoholism,[1] the Twelve Steps were first published in the book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism in 1939.[2] The method was then adapted and became the foundation of other twelve-step programs. As summarized by the American Psychological Association, the process involves the following:[1]

  • admitting that one cannot control one’s addiction or compulsion;
  • recognizing a higher power that can give strength;
  • examining past errors with the help of a sponsor (experienced member);
  • making amends for these errors;
  • learning to live a new life with a new code of behavior;
  • helping others who suffer from the same addictions or compulsions.
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